Lee Krasner

1908 - 1984

Lee Krasner, c. 1938–1940. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner in the classroom of Hans Hoffman, c. 1938. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner in the classroom of Hans Hoffman, c. 1938. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner at the WPA Pier, New York City, where she was working on a WPA commission, c. 1940. Photo by Fred Prater. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Lee Krasner at the WPA Pier, New York City, where she was working on a WPA commission, c. 1940. Photo by Fred Prater. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Lee Krasner at the WPA Pier, New York City, where she was working on a WPA commission, c. 1940. Photo by Fred Prater. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Lee Krasner at the WPA Pier, New York City, where she was working on a WPA commission, c. 1940. Photo by Fred Prater. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner marriage certificate, 1945 October 25. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, c. 1946. Photo by Ronald Stein. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, c. 1946. Photo by Ronald Stein. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner at the beach, ca. 1945. Unknown photographer. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Lee Krasner at the beach, c. 1945. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock on the beach, c. 1945. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Krasner and Pollock met in 1936, at a loft party in downtown Manhattan. He was drunk, his default condition in social situations, and mumblingly obnoxious. She brushed him of and forgot about the encounter.

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock on the beach, c. 1945. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Lee Krasner and Robert Motherwell on the beach, c. 1945. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Untitled, 1946 Collection of Bobbi and Walter Zifkin © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Photo by Jonathan Urban.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner with Krasner's family, 1946. Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, circa 1914-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner with Krasner's family, 1946. Unknown photographer 

Mosaic Table, 1947. Private Collection, Courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation

Abstract No. 2, 1947. IVAM Centre, Spain. Courtesy IVAM. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in a field, ca. 1949. Photo: Wilfrid Zogbaum. Smithsonian Archives of American Art​​​​​​​

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in a field, c. 1949. Photo by Wilfrid ZogbaumSmithsonian Archives of American Art​​​​​​​

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, c. 1949. Photo by Wilfred Zogbaum. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, c. 1949. Photo by Wilfred Zogbaum. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner - Untitled (1949)

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner at their home in East Hampton, New York, ca. 1949. Photo: Wilfrid Zogbaum.  Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner at their home in East Hampton, New York, c. 1949. Photo by Wilfrid Zogbaum. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Composition, 1949, Lee Krasner. Oil on canvas, 38 1/16 x 27 13/16 in. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of the Aaron E. Norman Fund, Inc., 1959, 1959-31-1. © Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lee Krasner, Stella Pollock and Jackson Pollock carving a turkey, 1950. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in front of his work, c. 1950. Photo by Wilfrid Zogbaum. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Dorothy Norman and Elaine and Willem de Kooning., 1950. Photo by Jack Calderwood. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee and Jackson, 1950. Photo by Larry Larkin. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jackson Pollock, Clement Greenberg, Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and an unidentified child at the beach in East Hampton, NY, July 1952. Unknown photographer. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Desert Moon, 1955. Los Angeles County Museum of Art © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation.
© 2018. Digital Image Museum Associates/LACMA/Art Resource NY/ Scala, Florence.

Bald Eagle, 1955. Collection of Audrey Irmas, Los Angeles. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Photo: Jonathan Urban

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner at the beach, ca. 1955. Photo: Unidentified. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner at the beach, ca. 1955. Photo: Unidentified. Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

Blue Level, 1955. Private Collection © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Photo: Diego Flores.

"Rebel artist's tragic ending" from Life magazine, 1956 Aug. 27. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jay Pollock letter to Lee Krasner, 1956 Aug. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Jay Pollock letter to Lee Krasner, 1956 Aug. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner, Birth, 1956. Oil on canvas (210.8 x 121.9 cm). © 2014 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

“Birth is a landscape of bodies: large, pendulous breasts and swelling shapes are indicative of pregnancy, but in a negative context, for the forms are dismembered, strewn across the canvas. … Whatever her intent, the work associates birth with violence and with the breakup of something that had once been complete and whole.”  
Robert Hobbs

The Seasons, 1957, Lee Krasner. Oil and house paint on canvas, 92 3/4 × 203 7/8 in. Whitney Museum of American Art, 87.7. © 2019 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art / Licensed by Scala/ Art Resource, NY

Lee Krasner standing on a ladder in front of The Gate (1959) before it was completed, Springs, July or August 1959. Photograph by Halley Erskine.

Polar Stampede, 1960. The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Image courtesy Kasmin Gallery.

Lee Krasner in her studio in the barn, Springs, 1962. Photo by Hans Namuth. Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Lee Krasner, Through Blue, 1963. Private Collection, New York City. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Photo: Christopher Stach

Icarus, 1964. Thomson Family Collection, New York City. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, courtesy Kasmin Gallery, New York. Photo: Diego Flores.

Lee Krasner, Siren, 1966. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Photo: Cathy Carver

Installation view of Lee Krasner: Living Colour at the Barbican Art Gallery, London featuring Combat, 1965

Installation view of Lee Krasner: Living Colour at the Barbican Art Gallery, London featuring Combat, 1965

Lee Krasner in the studio at work on Portrait in Green, 1969. Photo: Mark Patiky.

Lee Krasner in the studio at work on Portrait in Green, 1969. Photo: Mark Patiky.

Lee Krasner in the studio at work on Portrait in Green, 1969. Photo: Mark Patiky.

Lee Krasner in the studio at work on Portrait in Green, 1969. Photo: Mark Patiky.

Lee Krasner, Palingenesis, 1971. Collection Pollock-Krasner Foundation. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, courtesy Kasmin Gallery, New York.

Lee Krasner, Springs, NY, 1972. Photograph by Irving Penn © The Irving Penn Foundation

Lee Krasner, 1982, Robert Mapplethorpe. Gelatin silver print, 19 3/16 × 15 3/16 in. J. Paul Getty Museum, 2016.57.846. Gift of the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

Lee Krasner cutting up her early drawings from classes with Hans Hofmann. She reused the pieces as collage material on which to paint. Image by Ray Eames.

zice ca traind in umbra lui pollock, asta i-a oferit un fel de libertate

https://pkf.org/ratcliff-essay/
Poet Anita Barton-Williams performs her piece Dear Lee, inspired by Lee Krasner's life and art
Dear Lee,
‘The first approval comes in this form, 
this is so good you would not know it was done by a woman.’
Pain is the absence of colour, 
it is shreds of self-esteem flung on the studio floor, 
overlooking a barn full of privilege 
a figure of addict love - equal parts liquor, 
paint, 
theft? 

Before you pick up scraps of your self-diagnosed mediocrity 
scrape a palette knife, make a plaster
through texture, remind us to feel as well as to look. 
Inhale,
the canvas will tell you what it needs.

I stand and peep through the darkness, see a biographical struggle for light, 
a mirror, 
leader of the misfits, 
You pick people up the same way you pick up fragments of yourself,
make something,
make them new,
change form 
paint,
stay alive. 

Sketch bodies as instruments, heads pin pricks lost 
Did you feel the same way when they said you lied about your self portraits? 
I see the enduring shadow each time you dressed yourself in canvas, 
you made them see you 

It was intentional? To leave only parts of yourself, 
the rest you burned. 
I imagine you deemed them not good enough to leave behind. 
So many works untitled. 
Did you wonder if naming things would make them fail?
Did you wonder if naming things would make them less worthy? 
Did your name change make you more visible?
Did your propaganda win?
Did you judge yourself as they judged you for being a woman or were you brutal?

There was no life outside of paint 
Paint was the only way to breathe 

lucrările ei în mediul natural

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